Mar. 18: Hope and Resilience in Dementia Caregiving: Living with Ambiguous Loss in the time of COVID-19

March 18, 2021 9:15 am

Speaker: 

Jed A. Levine, M.A., Masters of Arts, Applied Human Development, specialization in Gerontology and Recreation Therapy, Columbia University Teacher’s College, Post-Graduate training in Modern Psychoanalysis, Center for Human Development

We will review the concept of ambiguous loss, first described by Pauline Boss, DSW, and the concept of resilience and suggest ways for social workers and other health care professionals to help caregivers build their resilience and identify resources for care and support in the community. The impact of COVID-19 on persons with dementia, their caregivers, and professional staff will be addressed, and how it relates to the themes of ambiguous loss, anticipatory grief and insulation or lack of insulation from the existential dread of death when working with seriously ill, aged individuals.

CEU credit available for New York State social workers,  one contact hour, free of charge.  

Learning objectives: 

1. Attendees will be able to identify the basic principles of ambiguous loss as they apply to dementia caregivers

2. Attendees will be able to name three sources of resilience for caregivers 

3. Attendees will be more familiar with community sources of care and support for family caregivers caring for a relative with dementia. 

4. Attendees will have a deeper understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on individuals with dementia and their family caregivers. 

Registration is not currently open for this event. Check back soon!

Speaker Information

Speaker information coming soon.

Jed A. Levine

President Emeritus, CaringKind

Jed A. Levine is President emeritus of CaringKind, NYC’s leading expert in Alzheimer’s and dementia care for more than three decades. The author of numerous articles on Alzheimer’s and caregiving, Jed Levine has dedicated his career to improving the lives of New Yorkers who are affected by a dementia diagnosis. Over the course of his long tenure at CaringKind, he helped develop some of the organization’s most innovative, creative and leading-edge caregiving initiatives, including the Wanderer’s Safety Program, a program that works with the New York City Police Department and other agencies to help locate individuals with dementia and Alzheimer’s who go missing. He holds a Masters of Arts, Applied Human Development, specialization in Gerontology and Recreation Therapy from Columbia University Teacher’s College, and Post-Graduate training in Modern Psychoanalysis, Center for Human Development.